Inside the Christian Right Dominionist Movement That's Undermining Democracy
Chip Berlet printable version print page     Bookmark and Share
Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 08:09:54 AM EST
Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann and Sarah Palin have all flirted with Christian Right Dominionism, but there's lots of misinformation about just what that means.

Dominionists want to impose a form of Christian nationalism on the United States, a concept that was dismissed as eroding freedom and democracy by the founders of our country. Dominionism has become a major influence on the right-wing populist Tea Parties as Christian Right activists have flooded into the movement at the grassroots.

At the same time, legitimate questions have been raised about whether or not potential Republican presidential nominees Rick Perry, Michelle Bachmann, or Sarah Palin have moved from a generic form of Christian Right Dominionism toward the more totalitarian form know as Dominion Theology.

Clueless journalists and crafty Christian Right pundits have mocked the idea that Dominionism as a religiously motivated political tendency even exists. Scholars, however, have been writing about Dominionism for over a decade, some using the term directly, and others describing the tendency in other ways. Many articles on Dominionism can be found here on Talk to Action, especially by authors Rachel Tabachnick, Bruce Wilson, Frederick Clarkson.

Dominionism is a broad political impulse within the Christian Right in the United States. It comes in a variety of forms that author Fred Clarkson and I call soft and hard. Fred and I probably coined the term "Dominionism" back in the 1990s, but in any case we certainly were the primary researchers who organized its use among journalists and scholars.

Clarkson noted three characteristics that bridge both the hard and the soft kind of Dominionism.

  • Dominionists celebrate Christian nationalism, in that they believe the United States once was, and should again be, a Christian nation. In this way, they deny the Enlightenment roots of American democracy.
  • Dominionists promote religious supremacy, insofar as they generally do not respect the equality of other religions, or even other versions of Christianity.
  • Dominionists endorse theocratic visions, believing that the Ten Commandments, or "biblical law," should be the foundation of American law, and that the U.S. Constitution should be seen as a vehicle for implementing Biblical principles.

At the apex of hard Dominionism is the religious dogma of Dominion Theology, with two major branches: Christian Reconstructionism and Kingdom Now theology. It is the latter's influence on the theopolitical movement called the New Apostolic Reformation that has been linked in published reports to potential Republican presidential nominees Perry, Bachmann or Palin. All three of these right-wing political debutantes have flirted with Christian Right Dominionism, but how far they have danced toward the influence of hard-right Dominion Theology is in dispute. It would be nice if some "mainstream" journalists actually researched the question.

"While differing from Reconstructionism in many ways, Kingdom Now shares the belief that Christians have a mandate to take dominion over every area of life," explains religion scholar Bruce Barron. And it is just this tendency that has spread through evangelical Protestantism, resulting in the emergence of "various brands of `dominionist' thinkers in contemporary American evangelicalism," according to Barron.

The most militant Dominion Theologists would silence dissenters and execute adulterers, homosexuals and recalcitrant children. No...seriously. OK, they would only be executed for repeated offenses, explain some defenders of Christian Reconstructionism. Even most Christian Right activists view the more militant Dominion Theologists as having really creepy ideas.

Much of the controversy over the issue of Dominionism is caused by writers who use the term carelessly, often conflating the broad term Dominionism with the narrow term Dominion Theology. Some on the Left have implied that every conservative Christian evangelical is part of the Christian Right political movement; and that everyone in the Christian Right is an active Dominionist. This is false. Some critics even state that the Christian Right is neofascist. Few serious scholars of fascism agree with that assessment, although several admit that if triggered by a traumatic societal event, any contemporary right-wing populist movement could descend into neofascism.

Advocates of Dominion Theology go beyond the democracy eroding theocracy of Dominionism into a totalitarian form of religious power called a "theonomy," in which pluralistic democracy and religious tolerance are seen as a problem to be solved by godly men carrying out God's will. Karen Armstrong calls Christian Reconstructionism "totalitarian" because it leaves "no room for any other view or policy, no democratic tolerance for rival parties, no individual freedom." Matthew N. Lyons and I call Christian Reconstructionism a "new form of clerical fascist politics," in our book Right-Wing Populism in America, because we see it echoing the religiously based clerical fascist movements that existed during World War II in countries including Romania and Hungary.

According to Fred Clarkson:

Reconstructionists believe that there are three main areas of governance: family government, church government, and civil government. Under God's covenant, the nuclear family is the basic unit. The husband is the head of the family, and wife and children are "in submission" to him. In turn, the husband "submits" to Jesus and to God's laws as detailed in the Old Testament. The church has its own ecclesiastical structure and governance. Civil government exists to implement God's laws. All three institutions are under Biblical Law, the implementation of which is called "theonomy."

Christian Reconstructionists believe that as more Christians adopt Dominion Theology, they will eventually convert the majority of Americans. Then the country will realize that the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights are merely codicils to Old Testament biblical law. Because they believe this is God's will, they scoff at criticism that what they plan is a revolutionary overthrow of the existing system of government. Over the past 20 years the leading proponents of Reconstructionism have included founder Rousas John (R.J.) Rushdoony, Gary North, Greg Bahnsen, David Chilton, Gary DeMar, and Andrew Sandlin. Kingdom Now theology emerged from the Latter Rain Pentacostal movement and the concept of Spiritual Warfare against the literal demonic forces of Satan. It has been promoted by founder Earl Paulk as well as C. Peter Wagner, founder of the New Apostolic Reformation movement.

For many, President Obama and the Democratic Party are among these "demonic forces." This has real world consequences.

In 2006 former Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris told thousands of cheering Christian Right activists that beating the Democrats in the upcoming elections was a battle against "principalities and powers," which many in the audience would hear as a Biblical reference to the struggle with the demonic agents of Satan. Harris (who played "ballot bowling" in Florida to elect George W. Bush in 2000) told the audience at the annual Values Voter Summit in Washington DC that she had studied religion in Switzerland with the godfather of the Christian Right, theologian Francis A. Schaeffer. Her speech there, which I witnessed and wrote about, qualifies her as a Dominionist.

In 2004 Ohio Secretary of State Kenneth Blackwell, another Dominionist, oversaw the election apparatus giving his favored candidate George W. Bush a boost into the Oval Office.

Religion scholar Bruce Barron explains that "unlike the Christian Right, Reconstructionism is not simply or primarily a political movement; it is first and foremost an educational movement fearlessly proclaiming an ideology of total world transformation." According to sociologist Sara Diamond, Christian Reconstructionism spread the "concept that Christians are Biblically mandated to `occupy' all secular institutions" to the extent that it became "the central unifying ideology for the Christian Right."

William Martin is the author of the 1996 tome With God on Our Side, a companion volume to the PBS series of the same name (Martin and I were both advisers to the PBS series). Martin is a sociologist and professor of religion at Rice University, and he has been critical of the way some critics of the Christian Right have tossed around the terms "dominionism" and "theocracy." According to Martin:

It is difficult to assess the influence of Reconstructionist thought with any accuracy. Because it is so genuinely radical, most leaders of the Religious Right are careful to distance themselves from it. At the same time, it clearly holds some appeal for many of them. One undoubtedly spoke for others when he confessed, `Though we hide their books under the bed, we read them just the same.'

Martin reveals that "several key leaders have acknowledged an intellectual debt to the theonomists." The late Christian Right leaders Jerry Falwell and D. James Kennedy "endorsed Reconstructionist books" for example. Before he died in 2001, the founder of Christian Reconstuctionism, R. J. Rushdoony, appeared several times on Christian Right televangelist programs such as Pat Robertson's 700 Club and the program hosted by D. James Kennedy.

"Pat Robertson makes frequent use of `dominion' language," says Martin. Robertson's book, The Secret Kingdom, "has often been cited for its theonomy elements; and pluralists were made uncomfortable when, during his presidential campaign, he said he `would only bring Christians and Jews into the government,' as well as when he later wrote, `There will never be world peace until God's house and God's people are given their rightful place of leadership at the top of the world.' "

Martin also pointed out that Jay Grimstead, who led the Coalition on Revival, "brought Reconstructionists together with more mainstream evangelicals." According to Martin, Grimstead explained "`I don't call myself [a Reconstructionist]," but "A lot of us are coming to realize that the Bible is God's standard of morality...in all points of history...and for all societies, Christian and non-Christian alike....It so happens that Rushdoony, Bahnsen, and North understood that sooner."

Then Grimstead added, "there are a lot of us floating around in Christian leadership--James Kennedy is one of them--who don't go all the way with the theonomy thing, but who want to rebuild America based on the Bible."

So let's choose our language carefully, but let's recognize that terms such as Dominionism and Theocracy, when used cautiously and carefully, are appropriate when describing troubling tendencies in the Christian Right that are helping push the current political scene toward confrontation and intolerance.

= = =

[editor's note:] Author Chip Berlet was co-editor of the Encyclopedia of Millennialism and Millennial Movements and a contributor to the Encyclopedia of Fundamentalism and the second edition of the Encyclopaedia Judaica. Originally posted on Alternet.org.




Display:
Chip, I don't know if you've noticed, but the last few years the back issues of New Wine magazine have become available in PDF form (1969-1982). Since New Wine was published by leaders in the vanguard of the lineage which developed out of Latter Rain, it is fascinating to find that the writings of R.J. Rushdoony appeared in New Wine as early as 1978, several years prior to the official creation of the Coalition on Revival--in the April 1978 issue, Bob Mumford cites Rushdoony's Institutes of Biblical Law multiple times and calls Rushdoony "one of the great Biblical theologians of our day." The context was a discussion on an alleged attack on male patriarchy.

What this suggests to me is that the elites in the Latter Rain stream (or, rather, what Latter Rain was evolving into) snapped up Rushdoony's writings quite enthusiastically. Given the nature of the Ft. Lauderdale 5 group, how closely they tended to work together, I find it very unlikely that the others in Mumford's group would have allowed such a ringing endorsement had others in the group considered Rushdoony's writing problematic. And if anyone in the group held any reservations, they certainly didn't for long. Rushdoony's articles, and cites of him and his work, show up in no less than 20 issues of New Wine from 1978 to 1982 (the last year of the back-issue archive.)

by Bruce Wilson on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 10:53:42 AM EST

I did not know they were available.
_ _ _

Chip Berlet: Research for Progress - Building Human Rights
by Chip Berlet on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 11:11:40 AM EST
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that Jerry Falwell's Liberty Journal published essays by Rushdoony in the late 70s and early 80s, as I recall. (I'll get some dates and post them.)

Let's all recall that this was at a time when Reconstructionism was  considered heretical by dominant premillenialists, but the Reconstructionist writers were certainly being widely read and discussed. But just because people were reading and discussing them did not signify total agreement or disagreement, even among each other.

What has always been the case is that the people who were influenced by Rushdoony and the other Reconstructionist writers was far greater than the number of people who called themselves Reconstructionists.  Their books were being read and discussed and having a profound impact on modern evangelicalism long before Ross Douthat was even born (1979).  Greg Bahnsen was teaching at Reformed Theological Seminary in Jackson, Mississippi for a number of years before Douthat entered elementary school -- and before he was fired in a dispute over theonomy. Herb Titus taught from Rushdoony's Institutes of Biblical Law for years in his law school classes at Regent University around the time Douthat may have been in college  even though he disagrees with Rushdoony on some things, and does not call himself a Reconstructionist.  As with so many things, the substance of what people believe and what they do is more important than the label that is applied.  

But history shows that the ideas of taking dominion, and of theocracy and theonomy were much discussed throughout the 70s and 80s in elite evangelical circles, regardless of what certain contemporary journalists and op-ed writers, or religious right advocates may say. These discussions continue to this day.

by Frederick Clarkson on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 01:28:23 PM EST
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http://www.csmpublishing.org/res_newWine.php

by Bruce Wilson on Sun Sep 04, 2011 at 01:49:55 PM EST
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...tweet-able (@maddow @jackcafferty @postlive) and Facebook-able article on the looming theocratic threat to U.S. plurality and global security.

I don't want these 'end times' enthusiasts anywhere near the dictatorial provisions of the Patriot Act--or the nuclear launch codes. Even if they didn't light up the world first what would non-NATO, ICBM-equipped countries do if soon-to-be-bankrupt America was to end up in the grip of nothing-to-lose religious supremacists who believe in demon possession & eradication as a path to an afterlife?

by MIJ6VI on Mon Sep 05, 2011 at 12:05:39 AM EST



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