AR Republican Charlie Fuqua Advocates Stoning Rebellious Children, Per Deuteronomy
Bruce Wilson printable version print page     Bookmark and Share
Mon Oct 08, 2012 at 04:11:51 PM EST
"a child who disrespects his parents must be permanently removed from society in a way that gives an example to all other children of the importance of respect for parents. The death penalty for rebellious children is not something to be taken lightly. The guidelines for administering the death penalty to rebellious children are given in Deut 21:18-21" - Republican Charlie Fuqua, from his book God's Law

"I think my views are fairly well-accepted by most people" - Charles Fuqua, as quoted by the Associated Press
It has rapidly migrated from the Arkansas Times - which has broken the story about a controversial book written by Republican candidate for the Arkansas Legislature Charlie Fuqua - to the Huffington Post, but so far media has not identified the most astonishing aspects of Fuqua's suggestion, in his e-book God's Law: The Only Political Solution, that rebellious children should be executed in accordance with Deuteronomy 21:18-21.
First, Fuqua is not advocating just any form of execution. By citing those verses from Deuteronomy, candidate Fuqua is recommending stoning rebellious children to death. Here is the scripture Fuqua cites, Deuteronomy 21, verses 18-21, from the King James Version of the Bible:

"18 If a man have a stubborn and rebellious son, which will not obey the voice of his father, or the voice of his mother, and that, when they have chastened him, will not hearken unto them:

19 Then shall his father and his mother lay hold on him, and bring him out unto the elders of his city, and unto the gate of his place;

20 And they shall say unto the elders of his city, This our son is stubborn and rebellious, he will not obey our voice; he is a glutton, and a drunkard.

21 And all the men of his city shall stone him with stones, that he die: so shalt thou put evil away from among you; and all Israel shall hear, and fear."

Next, Fuqua's view that the American legal system should be based on Biblical Law identifies him as a type of Christian Reconstructionist. On Fuqua's website for his book, he explains,

"Everything that is wrong with the United States will be corrected only when we turn back to the Biblical principles followed by our founding fathers. The prophets of the Bible told Israel that the nation would suffer as a result of disobedience to God's law. It is no different today. God made the universe and the laws that govern it. Disobedience of those laws always produces bad consequences."

As journalist Frederick Clarkson described, in a seminal 1994 article written for Public Eye magazine, a publication of Political Research Associates, titled  Christian Reconstructionism: Theocratic Dominionism Gains Influence,

"[Christian] Reconstructionism seeks to replace democracy with a theocratic elite that would govern by imposing their interpretation of "Biblical Law." Reconstructionism would eliminate not only democracy but many of its manifestations, such as labor unions, civil rights laws, and public schools. Women would be generally relegated to hearth and home. Insufficiently Christian men would be denied citizenship, perhaps executed. So severe is this theocracy that it would extend capital punishment beyond such crimes as kidnapping, rape, and murder to include, among other things, blasphemy, heresy, adultery, and homosexuality.

Reconstructionism has expanded from the works of a small group of scholars to inform a wide swath of conservative Christian thought and action."

Among the crimes identified by Christian Reconstructionists as deserving the death penalty (by stoning) is also juvenile deliquency. Stoning disobedient children is, needless to say, slightly controversial, even among leaders of the hard religious right. As a brilliantly satiric 1998 essay pulbished in the libertarian magazine Reason, by Walter Olson, titled Invitation to a Stoning: Getting cozy with theocrats described,

"For connoisseurs of surrealism on the American right, it's hard to beat an exchange that appeared about a decade ago in the Heritage Foundation magazine Policy Review. It started when two associates of the Rev. Jerry Falwell wrote an article which criticized Christian Reconstructionism, the influential movement led by theologian Rousas John (R.J.) Rushdoony, for advocating positions that even they as committed fundamentalists found "scary." Among Reconstructionism's highlights, the article cited support for laws "mandating the death penalty for homosexuals and drunkards." The Rev. Rushdoony fired off a letter to the editor complaining that the article had got his followers' views all wrong: They didn't intend to put drunkards to death."

Rousas J. Rushdoony held many notable positions, including a rejection of the Copernican model of the Solar System (he was a Geocentrist.) That position provoked a bitter dispute with Rushdoony's son-in-law Gary North, who cleaved to the modern theory espoused by Copernicus and Galileo. But both men were in accord about stoning. As Olsen's Reason article acerbically described,

"when Exodus 21:15-17 prescribes that cursing or striking a parent is to be punished by execution, that's fine with Gary North. "When people curse their parents, it unquestionably is a capital crime," he writes. "The integrity of the family must be maintained by the threat of death." Likewise with blasphemy, dealt with summarily in Leviticus 24:16: "And he that blasphemeth the name of the Lord, he shall surely be put to death, and all the congregation shall certainly stone him."

Reconstructionists provide the most enthusiastic constituency for stoning since the Taliban seized Kabul. "Why stoning?" asks North. "There are many reasons. First, the implements of execution are available to everyone at virtually no cost." Thrift and ubiquity aside, "executions are community projects--not with spectators who watch a professional executioner do `his' duty, but rather with actual participants." You might even say that like square dances or quilting bees, they represent the kind of hands-on neighborliness so often missed in this impersonal era. "That modern Christians never consider the possibility of the reintroduction of stoning for capital crimes," North continues, "indicates how thoroughly humanistic concepts of punishment have influenced the thinking of Christians." And he may be right about that last point, you know."

Charlie Fuqua's positions track quite closely with those typical of Christian Reconstructionism along another spectrum as well - Christian Reconstructionism embraces a form of radical economic libertarianism in which the proper function of government is restricted to mainly to the spheres of defense and basic policing but little else. As Fuqua puts it, on his website,

" If government gives all of us security in our social status (social security), it takes away our ability to excel or fail. As more of us get economic security from our government, rather than from our productivity, we become more insecure as a nation. This is because more and more of us lose the motivation to work to avoid poverty.

[...]

...Our founding fathers realized that government was a necessary evil. It is vitally important that we understand both aspects of that statement. Government is necessary to restrain the evil inclinations of individuals who would harm others for their own gain."

As described by researcher Rachel Tabachnick, in an article which maps out Christian Reconstructionism's growing influence at the level of state legislatures, Rushdoony's Theocratic Libertarianism at Work in the Nation's Statehouses, Tabachnick writes,

"The foundations of Christian Reconstructionism were laid by the late Rousas J. Rushdoony  in his prolific writing including his major tome, Institutes of Biblical Law and promoted through his Chalcedon Foundation.  Reconstructionism teaches that all institutions of society and government must be reclaimed from "humanists" and reconstructed on the basis of biblical law.  Reconstructionists claim that the unfettered free markets are biblically mandated.  In other words, God is the invisible hand behind laissez-faire capitalism and government intervention is putting faith in man instead of God.  Reconstructionist leaders have overlapped significantly with two other organizations that have sacralized radical free markets - Lew Rockwell's Ludwig von Mises Institute, which promotes Austrian School economics, and the John Birch Society."

 




Display:
The kind of parents who would even consider doing such a thing are the only kind who could raise a child who even remotely deserves it. As for Mr. Fuqua, he is appropriately named.

by Rey Mohammed on Mon Oct 08, 2012 at 08:59:40 PM EST

this sick puppy is in the next legislative district to mine! 30 miles down the road. Ugh. We have crazies running in my district, but not THIS crazy. Fuqua makes Akin look sane.

by phatkhat on Mon Oct 08, 2012 at 10:11:36 PM EST
and then a Monsanto agricultural biology research technician, born and schooled in Missouri (Missouri Baptist College and University of Missouri at Columbia "Mizzou"). Sorry about that, Arkansas residents. Southeast MO and northern Arkansas (Ozarks) - God's own beautiful country, with some strange residents and ideas.

by NancyP on Tue Oct 09, 2012 at 11:55:18 AM EST
Parent


Sooner or later, some preacher is going to lay out this "logic" with such fervency that (a) parishioners' kids will rebel against such teachings and (b) the congregation will try to enforce them.

I'm a little bit surprised, but quite relieved, that we haven't heard of this "divine law" being put into action already.

by Pierce R Butler on Tue Oct 09, 2012 at 11:51:11 AM EST

I suspect there are already cases that haven't come to light.

by Rey Mohammed on Tue Oct 09, 2012 at 01:05:17 PM EST
Parent
You very rarely hear of the violence the "Good Christians" commit, even though it happens - for one thing it almost never hits the mainstream news because "It's a CHURCH, it can't be THAT BAD!".

I suspect if people knew the truth... and I don't think any of us really has a grasp on the scope of the violence... people will realize just how close we're coming to the "Good Christian" version of Sharia law - it might start in about three months if we're not real lucky.

by ArchaeoBob on Thu Oct 11, 2012 at 10:00:24 AM EST
Parent

As far back as the 1980's, you'd hear of babies being killed in microwaves and ovens, toddlers with lethal burns from being tied to radiators and grills, and various portable-sized kids being thrown out of windows, "to get the Devil out of them". I know of none of these murders being tied directly to churches, but you know the idea was coming from somewhere. Between the time of my grandmother's death and their being shipped to my great-aunt and great-uncle in Florida, my youngest aunt and my mother, then ten and eight respectively, stayed with an odious neighbor who kept them in a closet and fed them on mutton stock because they were "bad children who had killed their moter by laughing and playing". Medieval Christianity held that embryos, fetuses, babies, and small children were "spawn of the Devil", and only after they had had the devilishness beat out of them could they be saved. It looks like that attitude is coming out again.

by Rey Mohammed on Thu Oct 11, 2012 at 02:15:44 PM EST
Parent
I'm sure some of those stories are urban legends--at least the microwave one--but there are more children beaten just to beat the devil out of them even today than any good parent would believe. The idea that it's better to beat your child with a rod because it's in the bible and that spanking them will only teach them to fear your hand, so it's more loving to beat them with something else; is the worst rationalization for doing something from the Bible (that you could tell might be done another way if you looked), I have ever seen.

by arachne646 on Sun Oct 14, 2012 at 12:25:11 PM EST
Parent
Someone just did it. A father beat his five-month old son to death because "Scripture said to". He shows no remorse. Rather close follow on Charles Aptly-named Fuqua's book, isn't it?

by Rey Mohammed on Sun Oct 14, 2012 at 11:20:45 PM EST
Parent






I read the table of contents in his e-book and it looks like standard Reconstrucionist fare to me so, I'm wondering, what other Old Testament laws did he explicitly support? I think that Deuteronomy 25:11-12 is the best one of them all. It should embarass the hell out of them.

by Villabolo on Thu Oct 11, 2012 at 10:55:04 PM EST


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